NAPLAN Practice Tests

NAPLAN is an annual assessment for all students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9. It tests the types of skills essential for every child to progress through school and life. The tests cover skills in reading, writing, spelling, grammar and punctuation, and numeracy. The assessments are undertaken every year in the second full week in May. 

NAP sample assessments occur annually on a rolling basis. In 2021, ICT literacy was due to be assessed, having been deferred from 2020 due to COVID-19. However, the ICT literacy test has been deferred again, to 2022, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2019, civics and citizenship was tested and in 2018, science literacy was tested.

NAPLAN Practice Tests Year 3

ACARA

2016 2015 2014 2013
Language Conventions Language Conventions Language Conventions Language Conventions
Numeracy Numeracy Numeracy Numeracy
Writing Prompt Writing Prompt Writing Prompt Writing Prompt
Writing Writing Writing Writing
Reading Magazine Reading Magazine Reading Magazine Reading Magazine
Reading Reading Reading Reading

2012-2016

2008-2011

National Assessment Program

Year 3 Example Tests Marking
Reading

Reading Magazine

Language Conventions

Numeracy

Writing Prompt 1

Writing Prompt 2

Reading Answers

Language Conventions Answers

Numeracy Answers

Smeebu

http://www.smeebu.com/old

Numeracy Spelling Grammar and Punctuation
Year 3A

Year 3B

Year 3A

Year 3B

Year 3A

Year 3B

NAPLAN Practice Tests Year 5

ACARA

2016 2015 2014 2013
Language Conventions Language Conventions Language Conventions Language Conventions
Numeracy Numeracy Numeracy Numeracy
Writing Prompt Writing Prompt Writing Prompt Writing Prompt
Writing Writing Writing Writing
Reading Magazine Reading Magazine Reading Magazine Reading Magazine
Reading Reading Reading Reading

2012-2016

2008-2011

 

National Assessment Program

Year 5 Example Tests Marking
Reading

Reading Magazine

Language Conventions

Numeracy

Writing Prompt 1

Writing Prompt 2

Reading Answers

Language Conventions Answers

Numeracy Answers

 

Smeebu

http://www.smeebu.com/old

 

Numeracy Spelling Grammar and Punctuation
Year 5A

Year 5B

Year 5A

Year 5B

Year 5A

Year 5B

 

NAPLAN Practice Tests Year 7

ACARA

2016 2015 2014 2013
Language Conventions Language Conventions Language Conventions Language Conventions
Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Writing Prompt Writing Prompt Writing Prompt Writing Prompt
Writing Writing Writing Writing
Reading Magazine Reading Magazine Reading Magazine Reading Magazine
Reading Reading Reading Reading

2012-2016

2008-2011

National Assessment Program

 

Example Tests Marking
Reading

Reading Magazine

Language Conventions

Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Writing Prompt 1

Writing Prompt 2

Reading Answers

Language Conventions Answers

Numeracy Answers

Smeebu

http://www.smeebu.com/old

 

Numeracy Spelling Grammar and Punctuation
Year 7A

Year 7B

Year 7A

Year 7B

Year 7A

Year 7B

NAPLAN Practice Tests Year 9

 

ACARA

2016 2015 2014 2013
Language Conventions Language Conventions Language Conventions Language Conventions
Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Writing Prompt Writing Prompt Writing Prompt Writing Prompt
Writing Writing Writing Writing
Reading Magazine Reading Magazine Reading Magazine Reading Magazine
Reading Reading Reading Reading

2012-2016

2008-2011

 

National Assessment Program

Year 9 Example Tests Marking
Reading

Reading Magazine

Language Conventions

Numeracy (Calc)

Numeracy (Non Calc)

Writing Prompt 1

Writing Prompt 2

Reading Answers

Language Conventions Answers

Numeracy Answers

Smeebu 

http://www.smeebu.com/old

 

Numeracy Spelling Grammar and Punctuation
Year 9A

Year 9B

Year 9A

Year 9B

Year 9A

Year 9B

 

Why Grammarly is essential for every student in 2022

As an English tutor, I see grammatical issues worsening as the years go on. 

One can put this down to the way it is taught in schools or the relative difficulty of grammar. Still, I genuinely believe that texting culture, Spell Check and general malaise have something to do with this. 

However, as children venture through primary school and then into high school and university, they are still making the same grammatical errors. Whilst Spell Check can fix up the letters of a word being jumbled, it cannot resolve common grammar issues. 

I truly believe that grammar must become a key focus in our schools and our homes. 

Recently, my student told me that he does not consider grammar and punctuation relevant. Whilst this momentarily broke my heart, it also offered me a teaching opportunity. I proceeded to teach him about a sad grandma and a pesky panda.

 

My student was perplexed that a simple line flick could dramatically change someone’s life. And so, it was an effective use of my time. 

Here are three ways that you can help improve your child’s grammar at home:

1. Story-telling in past, present and future

Encourage your child to tell you their daily stories in “past tense” from a young age. Ask them about specific verbs they have conjugated into past tense, i.e. “Ben, how would you say ‘ran’ if you were doing it right now?”. 

2. Read, read, read!

I cannot stress the importance of reading. It is so fundamentally important for you to be reading with your child every day until they can complete the task independently. There are so many exceptional children’s books, so finding content will not be a problem. Why not check out your local library to improve your child’s grammar?

3. Silly stories

Have your child write you “silly” stories that still make grammatical sense. For example, “the purple bunny farted and flew into the sky because it was so forceful”. There are chances to look at nouns, verbs, adjectives and other grammatical elements in silly sentences!

For my students, I always use a service such as Grammarly. Grammarly is a fantastic tool that “reviews spelling, grammar, punctuation, clarity, engagement, and delivery mistakes. It uses AI to identify and search for an appropriate replacement for the error it locates”. 

I use Grammarly myself as a student and teacher because I believe it gamifies the process of correcting your work. Students are engaged when they see their writing score turn from a 60 to an 85, and it encourages them to take more care in their writing in the future. 

Most students use the free version of Grammarly, but there is also a premium version that elevates language use even further.

Students can use it when they are typing emails to their teachers, writing assessments or generally communicating. It will create a habit of checking their grammar and writing in a way that provides them with alternatives and support. 

You can try Grammarly today by clicking the image below.

 

Preparing for the New School Year 

Preparing for the New School Year 

At the start of every school year, parents and students alike are often in the dark about what is coming in the year ahead. When students are in primary school, this does not feel so overwhelming. However, once a student reaches high school the thought of a new year’s content can become more and more overwhelming particularly as they reach the ATAR years. As parents or students, it is incredibly important to prepare correctly for the school year ahead. There are a number of strategies that people can use to prepare for the new school year whether in primary school or in high school. Here are my top five favourite strategies for preparing for a new school year to ensure academic success.

Number 1: Checking the Syllabus

Every year, teachers will create a learning plan for your child based on what is required of them by the Australian curriculum. Copies of the Australian curriculum for each year group and each subject can be found at the ACARA website. My recommendation is to search on the website for the appropriate year and understand what is going to be taught in the year ahead. Once you know what your child will be learning, it becomes a lot easier to frame your daily conversations and your daily questions to the appropriate year level that you were looking at. For example, you can find out on the year three science syllabus that children are going to learn about how liquids and solids respond to changes in temperature, for example water changing to ice, or melting chocolate. Once you are aware of this it becomes much easier to prompt conversations about this topic in everyday life. Children’s brains make connections to things that they already know or things that they have already heard. By establishing an understanding of the concept that they are going to learn in class will be much more engaging and they will be much more likely to hold on to all of their learning in the classroom.

Number 2: Lesson Plans or Unit Outlines

In primary school, teachers will often set units based on collaboration with other teachers in their school. Therefore, we know that teachers have some kind of understanding of the subjects or that in areas that they will be teaching in a particular term. It’s a great idea to reach out to your child’s new teacher at the at the start of the year and kindly ask for a very brief breakdown of what they will be covering in class that term so that you can reinforce different concepts and create different questions in your everyday life that will develop more enhanced learning in the classroom. For high school students, teachers are required to deliver a unit outline or assessment outline for each of the subjects that your child will sit (teachers of elective units may not be required to do this) and they should be accessible on your parent portal for school. Alternatively, teachers will likely give students a copy of this unit outline on the very first day of each of their classes for the year. Prompt your child to bring these home and make a copy of them so that you could have a copy at home. This is particularly important for year 11 and year 12 as sometimes these assessments will fall sooner than expected due to the sheer amount of content that is being taught at any one time.

Number 3: Note Keeping

Daily study is a little bit excessive for primary school. However, it makes sense for students to have somewhere that they can keep notes that they will likely need for tests. For example, if your student has studied Greek history in their humanities class, have them jot down four or five of the main points that they were taught in that class. They can keep this in a folder at home and this will prompt them when they are then practising for their test or if they forget important information to remember key lessons that were delivered as part of the unit. Once a student reaches high school, it is fundamentally important that note keeping becomes part of their habits. Having files at home where children can come home and do a weekly or daily dump of all of the key lessons that they talk about will help them recall what they learnt in the day; this will also serve as a useful study resource when it comes to test time. If this habit is practised every week students will find themselves in a much better position when it comes to exam time later in the year.



Number 4: Yearly Testing

It is a good idea to do a quick google search of the yearly tests that are expected of students as they progress through different years. For example, in year three, year five, year seven and year nine, students are expected to do the NAPLAN test. However, certain schools have requirements for students every year with tests such as the PAT test or the gifted and talented test. Understanding the different standardised testing that is going to be done through the year can reduce test anxiety as they are not sprung on the students without forewarning. It is good to discuss these tests and discuss that they are really useful in providing a picture of where students are out but not to worry too much about what happens with the results. It’s all about understanding what additional resources your child needs to help them in their learning. This could also be useful for students who are looking to enter selective schools as you will keep abreast of the selective testing that is done in yearly intervals.

Number 5: Getting in the Right Headspace

One of the biggest challenges that students have when it comes to starting a new year can be the anxiety of what the year will bring for them. The start of the new year can be a really effective time to create some mindfulness practices in a child’s life. Breathing exercises are really useful for students to self regulate when it comes to tests or things such as oral presentations. Meditation is another fantastic way that students can become more in tune with their emotions and learn to self regulate rather than let school overwhelm them. When discussing mindfulness with your children it should be made clear that all students no matter how intelligent they are have concerns about their abilities. This is a normal part of schooling and should be discussed as such. The more that we can destigmatise stress and make it a normal experience the better life will become for students everywhere.

I hope these tips help you in preparing for the New Year. Please reach out if you have any that I have not included in this list.

Canva for Students

Canva for Students

When I started using Canva I didn’t realise the potential that it had to change the way we learn and work. Over time I’ve realised that Canva can be a really powerful tool for teachers and students alike.

What is Canva?

Canva is a tool created by two Perth locals that helps individuals create templated designs from thousands of options in an online platform or through the app. It allows you to use stock photos, different fonts and other elements used by graphic designers around the world. Canva has been used a lot in the business world for social media graphics, presentations and for other important Mitchell marketing materials. But Canva also has great applications for students who are trying to take their skills to the next level. Here are some of the reasons why I love Canva as a resource for students.

Number 1: Practice with web interfaces

As digital natives this next generation of learners have become so accustomed to using web based interfaces to create wonderful and spectacular things. As part of the Australian curriculum, there is a requirement for students to learn how to use multiple different digital interfaces as part of their learning journey. I think Canva is a fantastic resource for students to learn how to design different elements that they will be required to create in their adult lives. They can create PowerPoint presentations, logos for their small businesses, social media graphics, to-do and checklists, important materials for their lives and anything else that they wish to create. Learning to use these design tools will help them in the long-term to become more familiar with how web interfaces and web tools can help them in their career.

Number 2: Improve aesthetics of assessments 

There have always been no students that go above and beyond in the presentation of their assignments for school. Whilst this is often not necessarily part of the rubric that is being marked, it is often looked upon favourably by teachers demonstrating the extra effort the students use to make their work look professional and sophisticated. Students can use Canva to create the finishing touch on their poetry, narrative writing, even their reports. It can really be used to make everything look 10 times better. I personally used it as a resource with one of my students to create a book of sight words to help him learn the meaning behind the words instead of just an arbitrary spelling. He really loves using the system because he could choose the picture that he wanted to associate with the site word and could make it look however he wanted with the appropriate colours and symbols.

No. 3: Artistic Prowess

There are some students who just light up when they are allowed to do art in school. They really get stuck into painting and they love creating different pictures from inside their mind. This is something that we should be encouraging as a standard because art is so powerful and so important in the modern world. Canva can be used as a tool for students to present their artistic designs in a different manner. They can create digital artwork or posters using the software and can even create posters to hang on their walls doors all for their study notes.

Sign up for a free trial for Canva today and see what you can create!

Disclaimer: Perth English Tutor is an affiliate of Canva

136 Irregular Verbs List

Irregular Verbs List

This list contains all the irregular verbs of the English language. Each entry includes the base or bare infinitive first, followed by the simple past (V2) form and the past participle (V3) form. Taking some time to make sentences using each irregular verb form will help you to use these verbs correctly when speaking and writing. Simply reading through this list will help you to recognize an irregular verb when you see one.

Irregular Verbs – Complete List

Base FormPast Simple (V2)Past Participle (V3)
arisearosearisen
awakeawokeawoken
bewas/werebeen
bearboreborn(e)
beatbeatbeaten
becomebecamebecome
beginbeganbegun
bendbentbent
betbetbet
bindboundbound
bitebitbitten
bleedbledbled
blowblewblown
breakbrokebroken
breedbredbred
bringbroughtbrought
buildbuiltbuilt
burstburstburst
buyboughtbought
cancould… (been able)
catchchosechosen
clingclungclung
comecamecome
costcostcost
creepcreptcrept
cutcutcut
dealdealtdealt
digdugdug
dodid done
drawdrewdrawn
dreamdreamt/dreameddreamt/dreamed
drinkdrankdrunk
drivedrovedriven
eatateeaten
fallfellfallen
feedfedfed
feelfeltfelt
fightfoughtfought
findfoundfound
flyflewflown
forbidforbadeforbidden
forgetforgotforgotten
forgiveforgaveforgiven
freezefrozefrozen
getgotgot
givegavegiven
gowentgone
grindgroundground
growgrewgrown
hanghunghung
havehadhad
hearheardheard
hidehidhidden
hithithit
holdheldheld
hurthurthurt
keepkeptkept
kneelkneltknelt
knowknew known
laylaidlaid
leadled led
leanleant/leanedleant/leaned
learnlearnt/learnedlearnt/learned
leaveleftleft
lendlentlent
lie (in bed)laylain
lie (to not tell the truth) liedlied
lightlit/lightedlit/lighted
loselostlost
makemademade
maymight-
meanmeantmeant
meetmetmet
mowmowedmown/mowed
musthad to-
overtakeovertookovertaken
paypaidpaid
putputput
readreadread
rideroderidden
ringrangrung
riseroserisen
runranrun
sawsawedsawn/sawed
saysaidsaid
seesawseen
sellsoldsold
sendsentsent
setsetset
sewsewedsewn/sewed
shakeshookshaken
shallshould-
shedshedshed
shineshoneshone
shootshotshot
showshowedshown
shrinkshrankshrunk
shutshutshut
singsangsung
sinksanksunk
sitsatsat
sleepsleptslept
slideslidslid
smellsmeltsmelt
sowsowedsown/sowed
speakspokespoken
spellspelt/spelledspelt/spelled
spendspentspent
spillspilt/spilledspilt/spilled
spitspatspat
spreadspreadspread
standstoodstood
stealstolestolen
stickstuckstuck
stinkstankstunk
strikestruckstruck
swearsworesworn
sweepsweptswept
swellswelledswollen/swelled
swimswamswum
swingswungswung
taketooktaken
teachtaughttaught
teartoretorn
telltoldtold
thinkthoughtthought
throwthrewthrown
understandunderstoodunderstood
wakewokewoken
wearworeworn
weepweptwept
willwould-
winwonwon
windwoundwound
writewrotewritten

How to Write an Interpretive Text?

How to Write an Interpretive Text?

One of the most common questions I am asked is to explain the process of writing an interpretive text. An interpretive text is sometimes a requirement of the Composing section of the exam along with Persuasive and Narrative writing. 

What are Interpretive texts?

Texts whose primary purpose is to explain and interpret personalities, events, ideas, representations or concepts. They include autobiography, biography, media feature articles, documentary film and other non-fiction texts. There is a focus on interpretive rather than informative texts in the senior years of schooling.

Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority

The way I describe an interpretive text is that it is somewhere between a narrative and a persuasive story – it’s a personal story with a message. 

As such, it uses a number of the same devices: 

Facts and statistics, selection of detail, sequencing of events, lexical choice, use of persona, colloquialisms, anecdotes, connotative/emotive language, tone, opinionative response, versions of reality, foregrounding, descriptive language, figurative language, irony, satire, rhetorical devices.

The purpose of an interpretive text is to explain all sides of an argument or issue, to inform by examining both sides of an issue, to provide a balanced discussion of different views, to present the pros and cons so readers can make up their own minds. They do not overtly persuade; instead they want their audience to take an active role in determining the message. 

Some examples of types of texts you can do are: 

  • Feature articles
  • Letters
  • Reflective essays 
  • News reports
  • Biographies
  • Autobiographies
  • Speeches

Important! WACE markers want to know you understand the audience. 

A common criticism noted by markers was the lack of attention given to the audience, particularly when composing persuasive and interpretive texts. Candidates would do well to remember that the primary instruction of this section is to choose ‘a form of writing appropriate to a specific audience, context and purpose’

Source: SCSA

In order to write an effective interpretive text, you need to determine the following elements. 

Context
Audience
Purpose

This will then assist with determining the language that you will use. If you don’t make these choices, you won’t be able to determine appropriate voice or language features.  

Interpretive practice questions:

Travel far enough, you meet yourself.’ Using this idea as a central theme, construct an interpretive text that reflects on a travel experience.

Write an interpretive text about a personal experience that changed your life. 

 

Why English is so Important for Stem Learners

Why English is so Important for Stem Learners

When it comes to modern schooling there is a large emphasis placed on STEM subjects. These include science, technology, engineering and mathematics. However, as a result of this emphasis, there is a lack of attention to one of the most important subjects that students can study at school – English. English is one of the most important subjects for students to master at an early age and it’s something that can become quite difficult as students progress in the years. English influences STEM extensively because English is reliant on an understanding and comprehension of the world around us.

 In mathematics investigations, students are required to read a passage and interpret the information and then answer based on the information that they read. Without a strong grasp of comprehension, students will find these investigations extremely difficult. If you think about engineering, there is also a heavy reliance on understanding. Many comprehension tests are based around novels and creative pieces, however, the skills that we learn and comprehension can also apply to reading materials such as articles. Students who are able to have a fantastic grasp of these different concepts find themselves becoming better students in the stem subjects. So how do you encourage STEM-based students to create a love of learning English? 

1. Engage With Their Logical Reasoning

 Many comprehension texts that are given to students as part of their study are based on stories. For logical thinkers, these can be difficult to interpret. Finding an informational text for the students to read can help them actually understand what is going on but with a logical and reasoning brain. 

2. Give them texts they are interested in 

Many students are forced to read what everyone else in the class is reading, however, students who are particularly logical will prefer reading about different topics allowing your child a chance to peruse the bookshelves for the catalogue at the library will allow them to find a topic that interests them. Even if they are reading informational text the actual process of transferring knowledge from the page to their brain can help them when it comes to other types of texts they will need to read in further school. 

3. Make it fun

A majority of students see reading as a chore. A lot of parents are me “how do I get my child to read?” Well, the answer is simple. Make it a fun activity. The biggest feedback I get from students when it comes to their reading is that it’s boring. The perception that reading is boring comes from the fact that there are so many other different things that they could be doing with that time. However, if you make it a challenge or if you gamify reading, students will have a much easier time finding the excitement in reading. 

There are many different ways to engage stem students when it comes to English. For more help, contact Perth English Tutor. 

How I Passed WACE English Confidently – A Student’s Perspective

WACE English can be a daunting subject for anyone who has never had confidence in the subject. For Stacey, who recently completed Year 12 – it turned out to be a piece of cake. Hear from her below.

1) How did you feel about English as a subject throughout high school?

English used to be a subject I struggled with during middle school. However, since having Bianca as my English ATAR tutor, I felt more comfortable and stronger completing tests, assignments and exams, especially when completing my WACE. I knew that all my preparation leading up to exams with Bianca helped me feel calm and relaxed about completing this course.

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2) What were you most worried about for Year 12 English?

There was not a lot that I was worried about for Year 12 English, as I felt comfortable when seeing my grades constantly improve after each test. So I knew that I was improving every time and was never falling backwards. However the one thing I was most worried about was not finishing in time, but I knew the only way to fix this was to use my time wisely by making sure that the 10 minutes of reading time purely went to reading the texts over and over again and annotating these in my head.

3) How did you study for Year 12 English and what tips would you give other students?

When studying for English it is best to continuously re-write essays, create new essays and read over essays. This will not only help you think on the spot, but helps you write faster and think about the structure of an essay as well. If I had to give one tip to other students I would say, ensure that when you are reading the novel given to you by the teachers, make sure you leave sticky notes on pages you believe would benefit you when writing an essay about the novel. So you then won’t have to go back and find quotes later on.

4) What was the biggest lesson you learned from the WACE exam that you could pass on to other students?

Calm down. You are stressing yourself out over something you have done a million times now. You know how to write an essay, you know how to annotate an extract and you know how to use your time wisely. When you open that piece of paper take a deep breath and just focus on what is in front of you.

5) What was the benefit of working with Bianca throughout Year 12?

Bianca is a bright and bubbly woman, who made me feel relaxed and confident, she never doubted me once and made me feel like I was capable of achieving anything. Bianca’s corrections would never make me feel like I have failed, she would explain the reasoning as to why something would not be necessary in that specific place. Bianca not only helped me get my grades up and achieve a higher score then I ever expected to get in English, but she managed to expand on my vocabulary which then made me feel like a confident out-going person. Bianca is someone who is striving to help everyone achieve the best they can and always puts her students first. Bianca is someone who loves to express good deed in anyway possible. I was successfully able to graduate from school, and complete ATAR English on a B, which I never expected to achieve, I also passed my WACE exam higher then I expected to get as-well. So Thank you Bianca for all your hard work and squeezing as many lessons possible for me.